“Actually, I don’t really draw that well. It’s just that I don’t stop trying as quickly. I keep at it. I happen to have high standards and I try to meet them. I have to struggle like hell to make a drawing look good.”
— Milt Kahl (via 2dtraditionalanimation)
2dtraditionalanimation:

Marina - James Baxter
reuendoll:

零
reuendoll:

零
reuendoll:

零

One of the rules I gave to the Kaiju designers is, I wanted to think how a man in a suit would fit in there. The spirit and feeling of the classical Kaiju, we are keeping them mostly two legged, not humanoid but sort of a silhouette that reminds you of those classical ones […] The first way you can do scale is context. Within the Kaiju itself, the texture, when you look close, you see what looks like a scale and then you go closer and there’s a bunch of bumps and cracks that give you the scale. If you do a close up in a six foot, seven foot, eight foot tall monster, you never get that close, you never get the sense of texture that you get with a Kaiju. - Guillermo Del Toro

One of the rules I gave to the Kaiju designers is, I wanted to think how a man in a suit would fit in there. The spirit and feeling of the classical Kaiju, we are keeping them mostly two legged, not humanoid but sort of a silhouette that reminds you of those classical ones […] The first way you can do scale is context. Within the Kaiju itself, the texture, when you look close, you see what looks like a scale and then you go closer and there’s a bunch of bumps and cracks that give you the scale. If you do a close up in a six foot, seven foot, eight foot tall monster, you never get that close, you never get the sense of texture that you get with a Kaiju. - Guillermo Del Toro

One of the rules I gave to the Kaiju designers is, I wanted to think how a man in a suit would fit in there. The spirit and feeling of the classical Kaiju, we are keeping them mostly two legged, not humanoid but sort of a silhouette that reminds you of those classical ones […] The first way you can do scale is context. Within the Kaiju itself, the texture, when you look close, you see what looks like a scale and then you go closer and there’s a bunch of bumps and cracks that give you the scale. If you do a close up in a six foot, seven foot, eight foot tall monster, you never get that close, you never get the sense of texture that you get with a Kaiju. - Guillermo Del Toro

One of the rules I gave to the Kaiju designers is, I wanted to think how a man in a suit would fit in there. The spirit and feeling of the classical Kaiju, we are keeping them mostly two legged, not humanoid but sort of a silhouette that reminds you of those classical ones […] The first way you can do scale is context. Within the Kaiju itself, the texture, when you look close, you see what looks like a scale and then you go closer and there’s a bunch of bumps and cracks that give you the scale. If you do a close up in a six foot, seven foot, eight foot tall monster, you never get that close, you never get the sense of texture that you get with a Kaiju. - Guillermo Del Toro

One of the rules I gave to the Kaiju designers is, I wanted to think how a man in a suit would fit in there. The spirit and feeling of the classical Kaiju, we are keeping them mostly two legged, not humanoid but sort of a silhouette that reminds you of those classical ones […] The first way you can do scale is context. Within the Kaiju itself, the texture, when you look close, you see what looks like a scale and then you go closer and there’s a bunch of bumps and cracks that give you the scale. If you do a close up in a six foot, seven foot, eight foot tall monster, you never get that close, you never get the sense of texture that you get with a Kaiju. - Guillermo Del Toro

One of the rules I gave to the Kaiju designers is, I wanted to think how a man in a suit would fit in there. The spirit and feeling of the classical Kaiju, we are keeping them mostly two legged, not humanoid but sort of a silhouette that reminds you of those classical ones […] The first way you can do scale is context. Within the Kaiju itself, the texture, when you look close, you see what looks like a scale and then you go closer and there’s a bunch of bumps and cracks that give you the scale. If you do a close up in a six foot, seven foot, eight foot tall monster, you never get that close, you never get the sense of texture that you get with a Kaiju. - Guillermo Del Toro

One of the rules I gave to the Kaiju designers is, I wanted to think how a man in a suit would fit in there. The spirit and feeling of the classical Kaiju, we are keeping them mostly two legged, not humanoid but sort of a silhouette that reminds you of those classical ones […] The first way you can do scale is context. Within the Kaiju itself, the texture, when you look close, you see what looks like a scale and then you go closer and there’s a bunch of bumps and cracks that give you the scale. If you do a close up in a six foot, seven foot, eight foot tall monster, you never get that close, you never get the sense of texture that you get with a Kaiju. - Guillermo Del Toro

One of the rules I gave to the Kaiju designers is, I wanted to think how a man in a suit would fit in there. The spirit and feeling of the classical Kaiju, we are keeping them mostly two legged, not humanoid but sort of a silhouette that reminds you of those classical ones […] The first way you can do scale is context. Within the Kaiju itself, the texture, when you look close, you see what looks like a scale and then you go closer and there’s a bunch of bumps and cracks that give you the scale. If you do a close up in a six foot, seven foot, eight foot tall monster, you never get that close, you never get the sense of texture that you get with a Kaiju. - Guillermo Del Toro

One of the rules I gave to the Kaiju designers is, I wanted to think how a man in a suit would fit in there. The spirit and feeling of the classical Kaiju, we are keeping them mostly two legged, not humanoid but sort of a silhouette that reminds you of those classical ones […] The first way you can do scale is context. Within the Kaiju itself, the texture, when you look close, you see what looks like a scale and then you go closer and there’s a bunch of bumps and cracks that give you the scale. If you do a close up in a six foot, seven foot, eight foot tall monster, you never get that close, you never get the sense of texture that you get with a Kaiju. - Guillermo Del Toro

One of the rules I gave to the Kaiju designers is, I wanted to think how a man in a suit would fit in there. The spirit and feeling of the classical Kaiju, we are keeping them mostly two legged, not humanoid but sort of a silhouette that reminds you of those classical ones […] The first way you can do scale is context. Within the Kaiju itself, the texture, when you look close, you see what looks like a scale and then you go closer and there’s a bunch of bumps and cracks that give you the scale. If you do a close up in a six foot, seven foot, eight foot tall monster, you never get that close, you never get the sense of texture that you get with a Kaiju. - Guillermo Del Toro

One of the rules I gave to the Kaiju designers is, I wanted to think how a man in a suit would fit in there. The spirit and feeling of the classical Kaiju, we are keeping them mostly two legged, not humanoid but sort of a silhouette that reminds you of those classical ones […] The first way you can do scale is context. Within the Kaiju itself, the texture, when you look close, you see what looks like a scale and then you go closer and there’s a bunch of bumps and cracks that give you the scale. If you do a close up in a six foot, seven foot, eight foot tall monster, you never get that close, you never get the sense of texture that you get with a Kaiju. - Guillermo Del Toro

(via pizzzaprince)

wannabeanimator:

Frederic Stewart
wannabeanimator:

Frederic Stewart
wannabeanimator:

Frederic Stewart
wannabeanimator:

Frederic Stewart
wannabeanimator:

Frederic Stewart

Art Of The Title: Taxi Driver (1976) by Dan Perri
One of the purpose for creating a title design is  to tease the audience, what are they going to see for the next 2 hours? Hopefully, those first minutes makes them glued to the their seat and enjoy the adrenaline rush before the movie starts.
For Dan Perri’s design in Taxi Driver, we see the world of Travis Bickle through his own eyes as he observes the city streets in New york. This provides an insight into Travis mind and his relationship with the city. Then we hear Bernard Herrman’s iconic saxophone medley theme song to support the melancholy mood, and it just fits perfectly. Also, the use of beautiful vibrant colors contrast with a night scenery. The title design is haunting and beautiful, and somehow you can help but think “okay, what the hell am I getting myself into?” you can almost hear Scorsese replying,”Oh you have no idea.”

Art Of The Title: Taxi Driver (1976) by Dan Perri
One of the purpose for creating a title design is  to tease the audience, what are they going to see for the next 2 hours? Hopefully, those first minutes makes them glued to the their seat and enjoy the adrenaline rush before the movie starts.
For Dan Perri’s design in Taxi Driver, we see the world of Travis Bickle through his own eyes as he observes the city streets in New york. This provides an insight into Travis mind and his relationship with the city. Then we hear Bernard Herrman’s iconic saxophone medley theme song to support the melancholy mood, and it just fits perfectly. Also, the use of beautiful vibrant colors contrast with a night scenery. The title design is haunting and beautiful, and somehow you can help but think “okay, what the hell am I getting myself into?” you can almost hear Scorsese replying,”Oh you have no idea.”

Art Of The Title: Taxi Driver (1976) by Dan Perri
One of the purpose for creating a title design is  to tease the audience, what are they going to see for the next 2 hours? Hopefully, those first minutes makes them glued to the their seat and enjoy the adrenaline rush before the movie starts.
For Dan Perri’s design in Taxi Driver, we see the world of Travis Bickle through his own eyes as he observes the city streets in New york. This provides an insight into Travis mind and his relationship with the city. Then we hear Bernard Herrman’s iconic saxophone medley theme song to support the melancholy mood, and it just fits perfectly. Also, the use of beautiful vibrant colors contrast with a night scenery. The title design is haunting and beautiful, and somehow you can help but think “okay, what the hell am I getting myself into?” you can almost hear Scorsese replying,”Oh you have no idea.”

Art Of The Title: Taxi Driver (1976) by Dan Perri
One of the purpose for creating a title design is  to tease the audience, what are they going to see for the next 2 hours? Hopefully, those first minutes makes them glued to the their seat and enjoy the adrenaline rush before the movie starts.
For Dan Perri’s design in Taxi Driver, we see the world of Travis Bickle through his own eyes as he observes the city streets in New york. This provides an insight into Travis mind and his relationship with the city. Then we hear Bernard Herrman’s iconic saxophone medley theme song to support the melancholy mood, and it just fits perfectly. Also, the use of beautiful vibrant colors contrast with a night scenery. The title design is haunting and beautiful, and somehow you can help but think “okay, what the hell am I getting myself into?” you can almost hear Scorsese replying,”Oh you have no idea.”

Art Of The Title: Taxi Driver (1976) by Dan Perri
One of the purpose for creating a title design is  to tease the audience, what are they going to see for the next 2 hours? Hopefully, those first minutes makes them glued to the their seat and enjoy the adrenaline rush before the movie starts.
For Dan Perri’s design in Taxi Driver, we see the world of Travis Bickle through his own eyes as he observes the city streets in New york. This provides an insight into Travis mind and his relationship with the city. Then we hear Bernard Herrman’s iconic saxophone medley theme song to support the melancholy mood, and it just fits perfectly. Also, the use of beautiful vibrant colors contrast with a night scenery. The title design is haunting and beautiful, and somehow you can help but think “okay, what the hell am I getting myself into?” you can almost hear Scorsese replying,”Oh you have no idea.”

Art Of The Title: Taxi Driver (1976) by Dan Perri
One of the purpose for creating a title design is  to tease the audience, what are they going to see for the next 2 hours? Hopefully, those first minutes makes them glued to the their seat and enjoy the adrenaline rush before the movie starts.
For Dan Perri’s design in Taxi Driver, we see the world of Travis Bickle through his own eyes as he observes the city streets in New york. This provides an insight into Travis mind and his relationship with the city. Then we hear Bernard Herrman’s iconic saxophone medley theme song to support the melancholy mood, and it just fits perfectly. Also, the use of beautiful vibrant colors contrast with a night scenery. The title design is haunting and beautiful, and somehow you can help but think “okay, what the hell am I getting myself into?” you can almost hear Scorsese replying,”Oh you have no idea.”

Art Of The Title: Taxi Driver (1976) by Dan Perri
One of the purpose for creating a title design is  to tease the audience, what are they going to see for the next 2 hours? Hopefully, those first minutes makes them glued to the their seat and enjoy the adrenaline rush before the movie starts.
For Dan Perri’s design in Taxi Driver, we see the world of Travis Bickle through his own eyes as he observes the city streets in New york. This provides an insight into Travis mind and his relationship with the city. Then we hear Bernard Herrman’s iconic saxophone medley theme song to support the melancholy mood, and it just fits perfectly. Also, the use of beautiful vibrant colors contrast with a night scenery. The title design is haunting and beautiful, and somehow you can help but think “okay, what the hell am I getting myself into?” you can almost hear Scorsese replying,”Oh you have no idea.”

Art Of The Title: Taxi Driver (1976) by Dan Perri
One of the purpose for creating a title design is  to tease the audience, what are they going to see for the next 2 hours? Hopefully, those first minutes makes them glued to the their seat and enjoy the adrenaline rush before the movie starts.
For Dan Perri’s design in Taxi Driver, we see the world of Travis Bickle through his own eyes as he observes the city streets in New york. This provides an insight into Travis mind and his relationship with the city. Then we hear Bernard Herrman’s iconic saxophone medley theme song to support the melancholy mood, and it just fits perfectly. Also, the use of beautiful vibrant colors contrast with a night scenery. The title design is haunting and beautiful, and somehow you can help but think “okay, what the hell am I getting myself into?” you can almost hear Scorsese replying,”Oh you have no idea.”

Art Of The Title: Taxi Driver (1976) by Dan Perri

One of the purpose for creating a title design is  to tease the audience, what are they going to see for the next 2 hours? Hopefully, those first minutes makes them glued to the their seat and enjoy the adrenaline rush before the movie starts.

For Dan Perri’s design in Taxi Driver, we see the world of Travis Bickle through his own eyes as he observes the city streets in New york. This provides an insight into Travis mind and his relationship with the city. Then we hear Bernard Herrman’s iconic saxophone medley theme song to support the melancholy mood, and it just fits perfectly. Also, the use of beautiful vibrant colors contrast with a night scenery. The title design is haunting and beautiful, and somehow you can help but think “okay, what the hell am I getting myself into?” you can almost hear Scorsese replying,”Oh you have no idea.”

(via cinematicfantastic)

joy-ang:

Cats putting their cute little butts anywhere they please. This will be available as a print at VCAF next weekend! #cats

(via pizzzaprince)